New Road Laxey (North Laxey), 1868

Plan Laxey 1868

The plan shows the new road around the steep slopes of the Laxey valley - the old village lies to the south-east off the map. The road crossed the river to the north of the washing floor of the Great Laxey mine (the actual mine and the Lady Isabella wheel are further up the valley to the north - the row of terraced houses is Dumbell's Row, generally known as 'ham and egg terrace', was built by the company (whose chairman was George Dumbell) to provide housing for the miners.

Washing Floors at Laxey c.1895
Washing Floors at Laxey c.1895

The postcard view taken from the other side of the valley opposite Christ Church shows the 'ham and egg' terrace peeking out from behind the large mound of deads - it also shows the Snaefel Mountain Railway starting its climb behind the terrace - this image predates the construction of the MER Laxey viaduct and the almalgamation of the MER and Mountain Railway stations - the first Mountain Railway station appears I think above the terrace of houses.

The mining company also built the Christ Church chapel-of-ease.

Mylrea - Laxey Glen 1850's

The view published by Mylrea in the late 1850's shows the new church looking down the valley towards the old village and harbour.

detail from engraving by Philips c 1860
From Philips c.1860

The detail from an engraving by George Philips shows Christ Church chapel, the house to the left was the Mine Captain's house (now the Mine Tavern public house), the field between them now is the MER station and terminus of the Snaefell Railway. Just beyond the church was what was by 1868 the washing floor for the mine but in the engraving appears to be a storage area for the ore.

The plan also shows the various hotels established along the new road - the development of Laxey Glen, just to the north of the Laxey Glen mill, was some 10 years in the future.

Laxey continued to develop along the new road as well as in Minorca on the other side of the valley


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Any comments, errors or omissions gratefully received The Editor
© F.Coakley , 2008