Isle of Man Family History Society Journal Volume vii no 2 Apr 1985

index


ANOTHER MANX LINK with TRAFALGAR

Copied from a grave in Onchan Churchyard which, until recently was lying up-side down at the side of the graves of Dr. Patrick Scott, Nelson Scott and Lt. Lewis Buckle Reeves. "Sacred to the memory of Laura Buckle Reeves, daughter of Lewis Buckle Reeves and Anne Jane Reeves, formerly Scott, who died 26 Nov. 1835, aged 2 years 7 months. Also Anne Jane Reeves, alias Scott, wife of Lewis Buckle Reeves, died at Pembroke on 27 June and was interned at St. Mary's Chapel Pembroke, South Wales on July 1st. 1851. Walter Scott Reeves, Lieut. of .R.M. Artillery, youngest son of the above, was accidentally drowned Sept. 9th near the Isle of Wight, and was interned at the Garrison Chapel, Portsmouth with full military honours on Sept. 20th 1852, aged 21 years. Also Lewis Scott Reeves, Lt. Royal Marines. elder son of the above, died at Onchan 30th Dec. 1855, aged 33 years and interned here."

index


PARISH CHURCHES

We have decided to publish a photograph and some information in each journal on one of the Island's Parish Churches and this month we have chosen the church of St. Bridget in Bride, there has been a house of God on this ancient spot for over 1300 years.

The parish of Bride is the most northerly of the seventeen parishes of the Isle of Man. Its population was at its highest in 1841 with 1153 souls.

The Church was reputedly founded by St. Bridget in the sixth century. The old church, which lies very close to the foundations of the new, was originally one of over a hundred celtic treen churches or keeils.

The Present church had its foundation stone laid in July 1869 and although the first service has held in 1872 it was on the 8th September 1876 when the church was consecrated by Bishop Selwyn. Ewan Christian of London, was the architect, but most of the building work was carried out by local farmers and tradesmen. The master mason was Thomas Christian of Bride, and he was assisted by the lame stone mason, Jeptha Kneale.

All the monumental inscriptions at Bride have been recorded by the society, copies of which can be obtained from Iris Lyle.

P. Lewthwaite

Bride Church
For copyright reasons the linked photograph differs and is (c)F.Coakley

index


ELLIN CALLOW of Kk Maughold

Whereas it has been whispered about that Elllin wife of William Callow of Kk Maughold used indirect means tending to sorcery or witchcraft in order to prejudice her neighbours and their goods, she has this day voluntarily deposed on the holy Evangalists that she never directly or indirectly used any manner of means tending that way, & thereupon Edmd. Kneale asked her solomn forgiveness on his knees for having taxed her consolossly with practices of the kind aforesd; It is therefore ordered that no manner of persons whatsoever ,presume to revive the said slander or upbraid the said Ellin, her husband, children or relations on the said account.

sic Sub pena 3 ad asim Domini 40 days imprisonment & further punishment as ye law shall direct.

Datedd at Ballaugh the 17th day of November 1724.

Wm. Walker. This order to be published in Kk Maughold & as many other churches as Ellin Callow shall desire.

index


THE Origins of the names Qualter, Qualters and Qualtrough

by
J. LINTON

I originally became interested in the name Qualter when I started to trace ay family history and found that my father's mother's maiden name was Qualters. In attempting to find out more detail about this family I accumulated quite a bit of information about Qualter, Qualters and Qualtrough families, and having traced the line back as far as I could, I became interested in the origin of the name. This article sets out what I have learned. As in family history, I shall start with the present (known) and work back (into the unknown).

In its simplest sense, the origin of the above name is from MAC WALTER meaning son of Walter. After initially being pronounced with equal emphasis on both parts (as in the Scottish pronunciation), the emphasis on the MAC was gradually removed so that it become Blurred and more like M'cHalter, with stress on the second part. Finally the initial M was dropped because of lack of stress and the present form regained. This description however omits such interesting detail and what follows is an attempt to paint the picture more clearly, but it must be remembered that such is conjecture and opinion.

 

QUALTROUGH

This is the least complicated to deal with and so I shall start here. From work done by myself and, more importantly by Mrs Elizabeth Barlow of Mataasta, New Zealand, this name, when traced through families, leads back to the Isle of Man. There appear to be no surviving variations of the name, the occasional certificate found bearing the name QUALTRO or even QUALTERTHROUGH being the attempt at its expelling by an official. The name had taken its present form by the late 17th or early 18th Centuries. Thus working back through parish registers, etc., it is possible to trace family lines back to the second half of the 17th Century, although, as ever, some lines present particular problems which any never be overcome.

Moving further back in tine, we have to rely on the occurrence of the name in documents and here I must use 2 experts in this field A.W. Moore (ref.l) and J.J. Kneen(ref.2). They list the following variations, (Kneen listing sources as well as dates):- Mac Qualtroughe (1430) Qualtrough (1430) Mac Walter, Mac Whaltragh, Water (1511) McQualthrough (1521) Quatter (1602) Qualteraugh (1634) Qualtroh (1651) Qualtrach (1654) Qualtrough (1660)Coltrough (1670) Qualthro (1675) and Qualteragh (1698).

Reference to the parish registers enables the area in which the name was most common (and possibly originated) to be determined. In fact it was very common in the southernmost part of the Isle of Man, in the parishes of Rushen, Arbory, and Malew, and is uncommon elsewhere. (Moore asserts 'In the parishes of Rushen and Arbory, half the population is called either Qualtrough or Watterson, and in the parish of Malew one-fourth').

This reference to Watterson introduces another variation of the name. Watterson or Waterson, a Corruption of WALTER-SON, is another form of MAC WALTER. In the MiddleAges, Walter would have been pronounced 'WAUTER', hence its corruption to WATTER. eta.. The same sources as previously list these variations.

Watersone (1422) Watterson (1504) Water. Waterson (1511) and Walterson (1547).

Looking the parish of Rushen, there were approximately 100 Qualtrough and 400 Watterson baptisms in the 18th Century, while in the 19th Century, upto 1882 there were approximately 200 Qualtrough and 800 Watterson Baptisms.

An interesting aside concern the deaths by drowning recorded in Rushen Parish Registers (ref.3). Between 1740 and 1820 some 65 individuals of this parish were recorded as having been drowned while at sea or fishing. Of these, 16 were Watterson, none were Qualtrough. Later in the 1851 Census of Rushen, only one Qualtrough was recorded as a fisherman whereas 36 of the Wattersons were sailors, fishermen, wives of seafaring men, or widows of seafarers. Or again, between 1849 and 1869, 52 Watterson (male and female)married at Rushen, 17 Watterson men being seafaring, as were 31 of the Watterson fathers. Why the Qualtroughs were for the most part landlubbers,while the Watterson were seafaring is a puzzle. The locals would probably say 'the sea was in their blood', in any event, the association of Wattersons with water makes an amusing coincidence.

Thus far we have traced the name back to MAC QUALTROUGHE or MAC WALTEAGH or similar variation. This was the form in the 15th and 16th Centuries. According to Kneen (ref.2), prior to this period the MAC was not used so the name would be WALTERAGH (in Irish, UALTARACH). I have not yet been able to discover when the MAC would have been added but it was certainly between the 12th and 15th Centuries. Its use arose naturally as the population increased and further means were required to differentiate individuals.

We are now back to the name WALTERAGH. The Manx termination -AGH (in Irish -AGH) was often added to Gaelic names (and foreign names also) to indicate family or clan. Thus WALTERAGH means' the clan of the WALTERS', or, more simply, 'the WALTER family'.

It is probably a mistake to think of a split between the Qualtrough and Watterson families. For several centuries there would be free movement between the two, with one family adopting Watterson to show its 'Englishness',while another would adopt Qualtrough to show its Celtic origins. Since there was little changing after the 17th Century, there is little chance of tracing back a Qualtrough family and finding a link with a Watterson family. For family history purposes the two names are separate.

Moving further back we can now examine the origin of the name WALTER or,in Ireland, UALTAIP. This name was a favourite with the Normans, and was introduced by them into England at the time of the Conquest of 1066. According to E.G. Withycombe (ref.9), the name occurs in the Doomsday Book of 1086 as WALTER(I)US and G(U)ALTER(I)US.

The Normans took the name from the Old German WALDHAR, a compound of VALD meaning 'rule' and HAPJA meaning 'folk'. In other languages it has taken the form Walther (German), Gautier (French), and Galtieri (Italian) - recently a very topical name in the Falklands War (many Italians emigrated to Argentina).

Again according to E.G. Withycombe, there was a corresponding Old English name WEALDHERE, but this was never common. Thus, over a period of a thousand years, one version of the name Walter can be traced from the southern part of the Isle of Man back to the European Lain at the time of the Dark Ages.

QUALTER and QUALTERS

Turning to this form of the name, by following back family lines, we can identify two separate branches
(a) The Irish Qualters
(b) The Manx Qualters
However, as I discuss later, the Manx Qualters in fact adopted this name about 1840 having previously been called Qualtrough. Thus, it is my contention that the name Qualtrough is of Manx origin, while Qualter is of Irish origin.

(a) The Irish Qualters

Because we are dealing with people who have their own ideas and lead their own very individual lives, it is always dangerous to generalise. However, there is a sufficient number of people involved to make the following statement a good guideline - but certainly not a hard and fast rule.

Families whose name is Qualter or Qualters and who are of Roman Catholic Background will find their family history leads back to Eire. In fact to Connacht, an area in the western part of Ireland which is now covered by the counties of Galway, Sligo, and Mayo. Here, according to one authority (refs. 4,5,6, and 7) Qualter is a curtailed form of Mac Walter (Irish Mac Ualtair)which forms a branch of the Burke family.

To quote in detail from E.A.E. MacLyeaght (ref.5), 'The name Burke (and its variations) came to Ireland at the time of the Anglo-Norman invasion in the person of William de Burgo (called William the Conqueror by Irish analists),who succeeded Strongbow as Chief Governor. In 1179 vast estates in Connacht were granted to the de Burgos, or Burkes, but beyond sporadic ravaging, they did not, properly speaking, possess the territory-until the next generation when it was regranted to Sir Richard de Burgo by Henry III. It is unlikely of course that all people of the name Burke are descended from one man, but rather are probably also descended from relatives and retainers, etc., who followed their 'hero',

The Burkes became more completely hibernicised than any other Norman family. They adopted Brehon Law and proclaimed themselves chiefs after the Irish fashion, thus forming several septs, one of the minor branches being the Mac Ualtairs.' By the process already described, this eventually took the form Qualter.

This brings me to the problem of the name Qualter and Qualtrough originating in two locations. In his dictionary, P.H. Reaney (ref.8) asserts that 'Qualter, Qualters, and Qualtrough (are) Manx names for Mac Walter'. From correspondence I have had with the University of Sheffield, it would appear that Dr. Reaney Judged this from the form of the surname, believing that only in the Isle of Man did the Mac become curtailed to 'Q'. This leads to the conclusion that the Irish Qualters had an ancestor who came from the Isle of Man.

It is difficult to prove either theory. One method which requires following up is to trace the early forms of the name in Ireland. This Dr. Reaney has done for the Isle of Man, giving dates and forms of the name as it gradually changed. A similar investigation into the Irish form - MAC UALTAIP would have to be carried out. Tracing its development into QUALTER in Irish documents would prove a separate origin of the name.

In the meantime, it is my opinion that we have here an example of parallel development, and this for the following reasons:

(1) Nowhere in the Isle of Man parish registers does the name Qualter appear (see Morgan [sic Mormon] International Genealogical Index)

(2) Goodwin, in his genealogical study of Manx families makes no reference to the name Qualter(e) (correspondence between the author and the Manx Museum).

(3) Moore (ref,l) makes no reference to Qualter(s) and does not include it in his Index of surnames which includes names now obsolete.

(4) Similarly, Kneen (ref.2) makes no reference to Qualter(s)

(5) in his book (ref.4), MacLyeaght lists Qualter' Qualkin (from Mac Uilcin), Quinn (from Mac Cuinn), Quinnelly (from MacCoinghaallaigh), and Quish (from Mac Coise) as examples of Irish names which, he says, have no connection with the Isle of Man but which never the less have curtailed the Mac.

(6) It is not too difficult to imagine similar developments occurring in Irish Gaelic and Manx Gaelic when the two areas are so close geographically and the two tongues so similar.

However, as I have said above, it is not enough to imagine similar development, some further research work is necessary to prove this.

(b) The Manx Qualters

Having thus far tried to show that there are two separate lines, with Roman Catholic Qualters coming from Eire, any Qualtrough coming from the Isle of Man, I must now introduce a complication. About 1840, after the name Qualtrough had been well established, one of the Qualtrough 'family' took the decision to change their name from Qualtrough to QUALTER. Thus, remembering the dangers of generalisations, families whose name is Qualter or Walters and who are of Protestant background, will find their family history leads back to the Isle of Man, and that their name used to be not Qualter but Qualtrough.

In fact this branch (of which I an a member) is descended from one individual - Edward Qualtrough, a blacksmith, who was baptised on April 16th 1796, at Kirk Rushen, Isle of Man and who died late in 1834 in Liverpool. To go further back in tracing their name, members of this branch should refer to the notes I have already made on Qualtrough.

Looking at the life of Edward in more detail we find that on June 11th,1821 he married Elizabeth Hughes of Mostyn (flint) at St. Nicholas Church, Liverpool. Edward was baptised and married as a Qualtrough and both he and his wife died as Qualtrough. Of the nine children who baptisms I have been able to trace, all were baptised as Qualtrough (1822 to 1836) bar one, the last, who was registered in 1840 as a Qualter. At least five of the children went on to marry, 4 as Qualter, the only daughter whose marriage I have traced being married as a Qualtrough. Of the 5 deaths of children that I have been able to trace, 4 died as Qualter (one of the sons reverted to Qualtrough when he died possibly the father was the informant, as the son's wife had died earlier). By the next generation, i.e. the grandchildren of Edward, the name Qualtrough had disappeared completely.

This raises an interesting family history point. Having found the marriage of one of my ancestors as a Qualter, I searched in vain for a Qualter baptism. Then I discovered a Qualtrough' family having children of the same Christian names and ages as 'my' Qualter faulty. The missing link had been found, and a whole new area of research opened up.

The reason for the change from Qualtrough to Qualter is not known. The 5 individuals whose marriages were traced, all signed with their own hand, one with a particularly Florid signature. John Qualter, the eldest son, went onto be a founding member of a company which is now known as Qualter Hall and Co. Ltd., part of the Matthew Hall group, of Companies But that, as they say, is another story. The family did not appear to be illiterate with the change occurring because of clerical errors, and in any case, it happened too frequently, It was a deliberate decision. Possibly it was done to simplify the spelling and signing. Perhaps there was a deeper meaning.

Initially, the change was from Qualtrough to Qualter, by by 1880 all baptisms had changed to Qualters. Again it is not known if there was any significance in this minor change.

And here the story ends for the present, I would be grateful for any corrections, additions or comments on this article for doubtless much remains to be added to the Qualter/Qualtrough saga.

References
Ref.1 A.W. MOORE, Manx Names, London 1903
Ref.2 J.J. KNEEN, Personal Names of the Isle of Man London 1937
Ref.3 R. SELLWOOD Dead from the Water, Journal of the Isle of Man Family History Society. Volume IV Number 2, April 1982, pp.26-28 plus correspondence with the Author.
Ref.4 R.A.E. MacLYSAGHT The Surnames of Ireland, Shannon 1969
Ref.5 E.A.E. MacLYSAGHT, Irish Families, Dublin 1972
Ref.6 E.A.E. MacLYSAGHT, More Irish Families, Dublin 1960
Ref.7 E.A.E. MacLYSAGHT, Supplement to Irish Families, Dublin 1964
Ref.8 R.H. REANEY, A Dictionary of British Surnames, London 1976
Ref.9 E.G. WITHYCOMBE, The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names,Oxford 1950.
index


They Died Overseas

Monumental Inscription from Kirk Bride

309 in loving memory of/ WILLIAM TEARE./ late of Ballalerghey, in this Parish,/ who died June 27th 1900/ Aged 60 years ./"At rest"./ Also ANN ELIZABETH wife of the above/ died 2 May 1925, Aged 86 years./ Also CATHERRINE CAINE/ died June 1914 in Buffalo/ in New York, U.S.A./ daughter of the adbove,/ Also of their sons/ WILLIAM TEARE/ died May 1926 in Illinois, U.S.A./ DANIEL TEARE/ died Oct. 1932 in California. U.S.A./ TOM TEARE/ died April 1942/ in Transvaal. South Africa

Monumental Inscription from New Kirk Patrick

042 & 043 in loving memory of/ FRANK CURTIS QUAYLE/ 21st Co. Imperial Yeomanry/ who died at Kronstad/ Orange River Colony 2nd June 1901/ aged 25 Years/ MAGARET CAROLINE QUAYLE/ died at Liverpool 21st Sep 1902/ aged 21 years/ also/ FRED QUAYLE/ 10th Royal Fusiliers/ killed in action at Pozieres, France/ 15th July 1916/ aged 27 Years/ Also WILFRED/ youngest son of/ JOHN and EMMA QUAYLE/ who died in San Francisco/ California/ 25th October 1951/ also WALTER OSBORNE QUAYLE/ son of JOHN and EMMA QUAYLE/ who died who died ist Sept 1962-aged 88 years. In loving memory of/ JOHN QUAYLE/ of Glermaye/ who died 8th February li?2/ aged 53 yea-/ also on loving memory of/ EMMA ELIZABETH/ wife of the above JOHN QUAYLE/ died 30th D,.c 1,917/ aged 72 years. In memory. of/ HENRY WILFRED/ second son of/ JOHN and EMMA QUAYLE/ of Glenmaye/ who died 25th February 1885/ aged 17 years .

index


Laxey in the New World

...

Laxey-Bloomfield Memories

by Dorothy (Resse) Hondrickson

Thinking of Laxey. I remember the Sunday School papers we had to take home were Bible pictures of the lesson, so we could remember the teaching. I can remember sitting with Grandma Kelly (Louisa) who held my baby sister Louise, while I sat on her right and my small brother Willard sat at her left. My two older brothers sat with dad on the left side of the church with all the other men. My mother played the organ. If we children became restless Grandma gave us a white peppermint candy. Another thing I remember about Laxey was the small entry at the front where the wood was piled to keep it dry. Somehow a skunk would get into the entry, and at least once even cancelled out church services when he preached the area when someone came to light the fire for heating the

We had a hitching rail where church goers tied their teams, winter and summer. There was not a roof over this area and the horses were blanketed in winter. In the spring when the roads became so muddy we walked across pastures and woods, a distance of two or three miles to church. Our mother said it was common practice to walk to church and prayer meetings when she was a girl.

I remember how people felt about closing Laxey Church. The people had automobiles by that time and the preachers must have felt they could go to church in the nearby town. So we went to Mineral Point Congregational Church. But the Bloomfield church was continued as long as a Methodist preacher would come out from Dodgeville to conduct services.

Our family went to Mineral Point to church in the mornings and to Bloomfield Church for Sunday School and church in the afternoon. Dad and Mother had both attended two church services when they were children, so we were never allowed to think this was excessive.

Dad became a Sunday School teacher for the teenagers and Mother often played the organ there in Bloomfield too, but always felt the teenage girls needed to work into playing for their church.

These Sunday Schools were a strong influence in our community. There were some very good preachers in thos days who drove all kinds of roads to bring the gospel to the rural people. One Bloomfield preacher I remember was a Rev. Carver, who conducted a religious day school in summer at Bloomfield for a period of two weeks.

It was well attended by all the children in the community, who walked there, and I think we all remember the lessons he taught us. This may have been the thing which led to the organizing of the Sunday School class of the teenagers a few years later. Rally days, youth conferences, and other youth get-togethers and lots of teenage parties in our homes came out of this.

We were blessed with plenty of interesting activities as a result of our organized Sunday School class. Our community was held together this way.

I remember only twe of the Sunday School School picnics, and I really don't know whether they were Laxey or Bloomfield picnics. One was hold in Irving Jowell's woods. Planks were set up on wooden horses for tables and these were loaded with good food.

The reason I remember - our father, Roy Reese. had come home from town on the Saturday before the picnic with a collie puppy which we named Rover. He sat in the front seat of our old Buick and Dad said he would reach up and lick his face onoe in a while as he drove home. We were seven happy children that day!

Rover slept in the old rocking chair on the front porch. An owl hooted and Rover drove him away by barking that night. so we know he would be a watch dog! Then we didnt want to leave Rover home alone and go to the picnic. But Dad locked Rover in the woodshed and said he might as well learn that sometimes we went places and returned later, so we all went to the picnic.

Of the picnic, I remember taking off our shoes and stockings and "paddling" in the creek. And I remember a sack race which was very funny. It was a wonderful picnic!

Another time we met in Bert Mily's woods, which was also a pasture. I can remember having ice cream and lemonade. Everyone in the neighborhood was there and there wore old friends who had moved to Dodgeville. Mineral Point or other places there too - sort of a homecoming.

prev

index

 

UNION MILLS in the 19th CENTURY

by Priscilla Lewthwaite

Union Mills is a small manufacturing village, prettily situated on the River Dhoo, so the village in described in the Brown's Directory of the year 1882. This is the village that I am trying to reconstruct the History of and to find out about the families that lived there in the last century.

In the centre of the village there still remain a few of the stone walls of the mills that gave the village its name, up until the early part of the 1800's the village was called the Doway (the Black Ford) but in 1810, William Kelly the owner of the corn mill, who three years earlier had also erected a woollen mill alongside, issued some card money with the words 'Flail and Fleece United' and from then on the village was known by the new name of Union Mills.

Although only a few walls are still standing to remind us of the mill, the mill house is still there telling us that Paul and Elinor Stevenson lived here in the year 1725. Paul owned the mill known as Mullin Oates at that time; the mill office across the road from the mill is now the village stores, but on the gable wall hungs the bell that would ring every morning to call the workers to the mill.

By studying the census returns for the years 1841-1881, checking the baptism, marriage and burial registers of Kirk Braddan also the deeds and wills I have managed to make a list of the inhabitants of the village during the last century that by their occupations probably worked in one or other of the mills. If anyone recognises any of the name in the list as an ancestors of theirs, I will be willing to pass on any details I have of the family. In most cases I have been able to identify the house or cottage they lived in, the census returns are very vague about the exact address but by checking property deeds and studying the maps of the time, I can be fairly sure of where each family resided.

If anyone knows of any names that are missing from the list below, I would be grateful if they would let me know, I am also collecting photographs of the residents of the village that lived here in the last century. If anyone has any in their possession and wouldn't mind lending them to me, I can get them copied at the local photographers then return the original with a negative to the owner.

Perhaps there are other people on the Island who like me have gone as they can on their own family history and having enjoyed doing it, but don't know where to go from here, why not try studying the life of a small village, it can I assure you become fascinating to do.

Now on my walk through the village I can take myself back in time over a hundred years to when the lovely smell or corn being milled would have hung over the village and I can imagine just who I would have met on the road at that time. perhaps on their way to work at the mill or like now just slipping down to the village stores.

List of Inhabitants of Union Mills

All probably worked in the Wool or Corn Mill in the centre of the village.

PARISH

APPRX. D.O.B.

NAME

Years in the Mill

Occupation

Braddan

1816

Edward Boyne

1851-1881

Corn Miller

Braddan

1866

William; Edward Boyne

1881

Wool Spinner

Braddan

1858

Edward G. Boyne

1871

Wool Weaver

Jurby

1806

William Cain

1841.1861,1871

Cloth Dresser

Onchan

1790

Edward Callow

1851-1864

Wool Weaver

Braddan

1835

Mathew Corran

1860-1873

Chtk & Killer

Braddan

1847

Mathew Clague

1861-1870,1881

Wool Weaver

Douglas

1848

Margaret Clague

1871

Wool ~or

 

1833

William Clark

1871-1881

Wool Dyer

Braddan

1854

John Clague

1871

Wool Weaver

Braddan

1845

Robert Clague

1861-1871

Miller

England

1790

George Cleghorn

1821-1825

Dyer

Malew

1825

Mary Ann Cowin

1881

Yarn Winder

 

1804

John Creer

1851-1871

Wool Weaver

Marown

1829

John Cowin

1851-1873

Slabber Engineer/spinner

Braddan

1845

William Creer

1861

Dyer

England

1867

James William Dawson

1881

Wool Weaver

I.O.M.

1811

Eliz. Fairougher

1841

 

England

1825

Chrs. Foster

1848-1861

Wool Spinner

England

1820

Sarah Firth

1861-1864

Mill Spinner

Braddan

1824

William Farrar

1860-1871

Wool Weaver

I.O.M.

1826

John Gelling

1841

Corn Miller

Marown

1832

Thos. Gelling

1851

Corn Miller

Braddan

1816

George Green

1841-1871

Cloth Dresser

Douglas

1820

Robert Green

1841-1871

Wool Weaver

Braddan

1850

Robert Green

1871-1873

Wool Spinner

Braddan

1846;

James Green

1870-1874

Wool Weaver

Braddan

1849

Samuel Green

1876-1881

Wool Weaver

Douglas

1846

Willian Henry Green

1861

Cloth Dresser

Marown

1833

Daniel Gilmour

1851-1881

Dyerlkoaver

Marown

1806

Margt.. Gelling

1841-1851

Carder

Marown

1827

Margt.. Gelling

1841

 

Patrick

1786

Joseph Howgate

1841-1855

Wool Spinner/ Clothier

England

1823

William Karren

1861

Wool Weaver

I.O.M.

1816

Ann Key

1841

 

I.O.M.

1796

John Kelly

1841-1861

Cloth Dresser

I.O.M.

1806

Paul Kelly

1841

Fuller

Braddan

1827

Thomas Kelly

1861-81

Dyer

Braddan

1839

Thos. Kissack

1861-73

Miller

England

1786

Jeremiah Lee

1841-51

Wool weaver

I.O.M.

1816

Thos. Mylrea

1841

Miller

I.O.M.

1806

Thomas Maltby

1841-43

Clothier

I.O.M.

1818

William Maltby

1841

Clothier

I.O.M.

1801

Hugh McGee

1841

Dyer

I.O.M.

1827

Hugh McGee

1841

 

I.O.M.

1828

Eliz. McGee

1841

 

Braddan

1807

John Skillicorn

1851

Wool weaver

Douglas

1831

John Tooms

1861-81

Wool weaver

 

1790

John Tooms Senior

1852-56

Wool weaver

England

1847

Alfred Roberts

1881

Wool carder

Maughold

1825

Mary Ann Vick

1851

Wool spinner

Braddan

1824

Robert Vick

1851

Wool spinner

   

George Edmund Woodhead

1881

Clerk

   

James Corran

1860

Miller

Marown

1786

William Kermode(lived in Marown)

1851

weaver

England

1792

* John Loinder

1841

corn & Flour Dealer

Leeds

1797

* Richard Kilvington

1861

Cloth Finisher

These last two ware in the village at census time, and they may have had connections with the mills. I know nothing more about John Loinder but an Richard Kilvington once owned our cottage and after selling it still retained a right to rent a room for several years as if he travelled back and forwards to Leeds. I can't help wondering if he was connected with the woollen mill in come way when I came across his occupation in his will.

I have also collected quite a lot of information on the Stevenson family that owned the corn mill for several generations, selling to William Kelly in 1804 for £500. Also several of the members of the Dalrymple Family. they came into possession of the Mills in 1843, Dalrymple Maitland selling it in the 1880's.

index


DEATHS bv DROWNING or MISADVENTURE from KIRK Rushen BURIALS

1. John Kermode (Curchys) 05 February 1827 "This person died in consequence of having been crushed under a boat whilst in the act of launching it. He survived the accident only five days."
2. John Quirk 23 March 1827 "This person perished in Douglas harbour having fallen of the Quay in the night."
3.-----wife of Thomas Cooile 08 May 1827 "rhis person fell down a precipice near Spanish Head and was instantaneously killed."
4. John Crebbin 07 November 1828 ''This person was drowned in Port St. Mary harbour on the night of 5th of November."
5. Thomas Corkill 20 February 1829 ''This person was found dead in Douglas harbour whither he had gone to follow the fishing and he fell over the Quay on Monday night 16th February."
6. Robert Shapre & John Moore 18 October 1829 ''These two persons perished Killough Bay, Ireland, in consequence of the small boat upsetting whilst going to their fishing boat."

index


A Divorce January 1637

A Decree of Divorce betwixt Wa. Gawen & Ann Kellie.

Whereas; Ann Kellie of ye parish of Jurby wife of Wa. Gawan bearinge convented before us in the Ordinarie. Sr. Nicholas Tompson & Sr. Hugh Canell - officialls att B.P's court ye XI th of Jan: 1637 am there and then accused & charged by her husband Wm. Gawen of ye haynous sin of adulterie wth Edwa Lawson of Kk Andreas by whoa shee had two bastard children. & wth Thos Kelly of Jurby parish by whom she had one bastard child; wch charge & accusation made be ye said Wm. Gawen touchinge his wife her adulteries is sufficiently proved and confessed in ye face of ye Court by ye said Am Kellie. And forasmuch as clamation was made in forme of Law, in ye parish church of Ballaugh where ye said Wm Gawen was borne & lived, & in ye parish church of KK Patrick of Jurby where ye said Am Kelly was borne. married & now dweling, forasmuch (wee say) ye proclamation was made in said churches touching diavorce ye said parties & to denounce a nullification of their marriage for ye cause of adulterie according to ye Law of God & ye practise of all christian churches; And not withstanding no manner of person or pernsons as not yet appears to alledge any just cause or causes whoever way not procede to denounce ye sentence of divorce or nulliti of marriage betwixt ye sasid parties.

Therefore in dei nomine wee agree, sentence & pronounce a Nullitie upon ye marriage betwixt ye said Wm Gaven & Ann Kelly to all true Intents & purposee of separation, a thore mensa et vincle, whereby they are; not to bee accounyted or reputed as man and wyfe for ever hereafter. Nevertheless wee have ye said Wm. Gaven being ye inocents partie is at libertie to ---- in Domine in ye Lord when & where he pleaseth; But for Am Kelly the delinquent party wee do by virtue hereof inhibits her according to ye tenet of ye church for marrying hereafter wth ane manner of pson or persons a during ye naturall lyfe of ye said Wm. Geven her late husband.

Dated ye fifteenth day of ffeb 1637.

Ri Sodor & Man Nicholas Thomson Hugh Cannell

index


"Great Aunt Eliza"

ELIZA WITHELL nee CORLETT

 

Eliza, the youngest daughter of Stephen & Jane Corlett was given the names Christian Hannah when she was baptised at Lezayre. Isle of Man on the 22nd May 1842, but later on her marriage certificate she used the names Eliza Hannah.

The family moved to England sometime after her birth and prior to the birth of her brother Benjamin who was born on Christmas Day 1844 at Henbury in Cheshire. Eliza's father was employed as a manager on one of the farms belonging to the Capesthorne- Hall Estate. which is the largest estate in Cheshire and owned by the Bromley-Davenport family. Family sources say that Lady Davenport was a godmother to Benjamin and his brother Alfred my grandfather, who was born on the 7th September 1848 , although it was a Mrs. Davenport of Congleton who recommended the Corlett family when they emigrated to New Zealand.

Eliza arrived at Port Cooper with the Canterbury Pilgrims on the 16th December 1850. She came on the sailing ship "Sir George Seymour" with her parents, five brothers and two sisters Mary Ann and Jane who was by this time married to Thomas Stubbs and they had a baby son, Arthur. They came with the first boatloads of English settlers to arrive in the Province of Canterbury.

No doubt like many other Pilgrim families, they lived in a tent which the young Eliza remembers as not being very comfortable. When it rained her mother had to put an umbrella up over her youngest brother to keep him dry. Often there were whirlwinds which would lift the lighter articles up into the air and away. Frequently her mother would have to go down to the beach to search for their clothing which would be scattered among the boulders.

While living there the family had a Maori scare. At that time the road was being made to Godley Heads and among the workers ware a good many Maoris who were paid a smaller wage than the white-men. They had been refused an equal rate of pay which made them very resentful. Two tribes met in front of the Corlett's tent and performed a war dance. The new settlers were much alarmed and afraid of being massacred by these savages' A hasty search was made for arms. Eliza's father had a gun which had been presented to him by the Davenport Family before he left England, so undoubtedly this would have been produced in such an emergency, however, as it happened. nothing serious eventuated.

About this time Stephen Corlett was engaged to manage Mr. Watts-Russell's farm at Riccarton, afterwards known as the Illam Estate. He loaned the Corlett's a packhorse to carry their tent and a few necessities, also a pony to carry the youngest children over the bridle path which according to Eliza was a long, rough walk in those days. In crossing Shand's swamp they loot their shoes in the bog. By the end of the day. the family had reached the upper waters of the River Avon. It vas almost dark and too late to pitch their tent, so the family had to lie on the ground and cover themselves with a tent fly under which they spent the night.

In the morning disaster faced them, for when they went down to collect the rest of their belongings which had been sent round by sea, they discovered that the boat had been wrecked on the Sumner Bar. All they found ware some lighter articles which had been washed up on the New Brighton Beach. the tools and heavier things had all been lost at sea.

The family had to have somewhere to live, so Eliza's father built a dugout on the riverbank where they lived for at least a year, as her brother William died there on the 28th December 1851. During that time there was a terrible storm one night. The Watts-Russell's lived in a small cottage a short distance away from the Corlett's. Mrs Watts-Russell became so terrified of the storm that her husband carried her along to their neighbours dugout where he knocked on the door and asked permission to enter. Shortly after this, one of Eliza's brothers who had been sleeping in a smaller dugout nearby, came in to tell his parents that held seen a ghost which had passed him and floated to their door! What held seen of course, was the whiteness of the blanket which Mr. Watts-Russell had wrapped around his wife and not noticed that she was being carried by her husband who was obviously in darker clothing!

The dugout was roofed with weatherboards and had a wooden chimney which caught fire and had to be quickly knocked into the river to save the roof. The dwelling became infested with native rats and one of one of them got into Eliza's brother's shirt and had to be killed before It could be removed. These rats were great thieves and would often carry off food. On one occasion they carried off her father's tobacco which her mother later found abandoned on the edge of the river where the rate had left it.

The track from Rapaki to Kaiapoi was near where the Corlett's were living on the riverbank, consequently many Maoris passed that way. One day when when Stephen Corlett was returning from Lyttleton, he met a Maori with a spear. He demanded that he give him some tobacco, so Stephen handed over all he had and thought he'd got off lightly. No doubt he'd passed some on his trip to Lyttleton that day but considered it 'better to be tobacco-less than to be run through with a spear

There was one old Maori who lived in a whare (dwelling) near one of the eeling places on the river. He used to terrify the children who called him Mau Mau. He told them that he'd eaten many white men and hoped to eat more before he died! Eliza said that the children used to run in fear whenever they saw him coming'

In 1853 when Stephen Corlett bought some land in Raccarton he built a cob house. which according to Eliza, was warm in Winter and cool in the Summer. Certainly those early cob homes, built of clay and straw were built to last. When in later years the house was pulled down, the walls were so strong that they had to be first sawn into sections, then pulled down with the help on horses.

Another vivid memory the young Eliza had was when she was left in a dray to which six bullocks were hitched. Something startled the bullocks who bolted helter-skelter through the Papanui Bush. The men were afraid that the dray would overturn and the young girl would be seriously hurt but finally they were caught with no harm done, except for a very frightened Eliza who no doubt had hung on for dear life!

In those days travelling was very slow. there were no roads and horses were very scarce and expensive to buy, so it was either a case of walking or going by bullock dray. When Eliza and family went to visit her sister Jane Stubbs who lived in Oxford, the journey would take two days. Her father would fix a cover to go over the dray and the family would spend the night under It, stopping about half-way and continuing their journey the following day.

Eliza Hannah, grew up to be a very tall woman, with light brown hair and grey eyes. She was a reserved, serious type of person who always held herself very straight. She loved clothes and jewellery and by her photos she was every inch a lady! Like many Manx people, Eliza was a thrifty person and always carried her money in a calico belt which she wore throughout the day, under her numerous petticoats. Eliza was fond of nature and according to her eldest grandaughter, Thelma. always talked about the fields of primroses and bluebells she could remember in England as a little girl.

In the early days the Corlett's lived next to the Rhode's and on one particular occasion loaned a dinner set to their neighbours who wore holding a dinner party. Each member of the family was entrusted with pieces of the dinner set to carry over to the party, wending their way through dense lupins to do so. There's no account of that precious set being broken.

At the age of thirty eight, Eliza married Charles, a widower, their marriage service being held in her late father's home in Curlett's Road, Riccarton and conducted by the Rev. J. Aldred on 3rd Nov 1880. Charles and Eliza had two daughters, Mary Mabel Eliza who was born in 1882 and Lillian Lawson born 27 Nov 1884.

In an early Sunday School Register for the Methodist Church, Riccarton, I discovered that little Mary Withell of Corlet's Lane attended Sunday School there in October 1886. Later, at a big society wedding, this young girl better known as May, married Frederick Kibblewhite on 21 April 1904. They had one child Thelma Lilliam who was born on their first wedding anniversary. Sadley May Kibblewhite died on 14 July 1909 and on her death-bed her sister Lillian promised that she would take care of her husband and child. So it was that Lillian Withell married her sister's widowed husband in Feb. 1911 and they had a family of four children.

In 1908 when Charles and Eliza Withell retired to New Brighton they lived in union Street next door to the Kibblewhites. At the head of the stairs in their home, hung a painting of Capesthorne Hall. a reminder of those early days in Cheshire.

At the age of 82 years Eliza Withell, 'by then widowed. was interviewed several times by W. S. Lovell-Smith who was at that time (1924) a member of the Historical Committee for the Canterbury Pilgrims Assoc, We have him to thank for the splendid written contribution he's made to our family history and which I've woven into this story of my great aunt Eliza who passed away on 8 Aug. 1928 having spent 78 Years of her life in New Zealand and many thousands of miles from Ellan Vannin where she was born.

 

Mrs. Frances. V. Stewart, New Zealand.

 

index


Taken from "The Sun" - 26th February 1836

DEATHS.

"Yesterday week, in Peel Mr. John Cowen joiner aged 70 years. The deceased made his own coffin upwards of four years since and used it as a food chest up to the time of his death, and was buried in it on Sunday last."

index


HALLS OF MARKET STREET

Apparently my grandmother - born Alice Frances Hall used to say that the Halls were in Market Street for over forty years and that she was the youngest of ten children. She also used to say that as there were so many children, some of them slept next door.

The Market Street in question lies to the east of Liverpool Street Station in London. Since her day though, it has changed its face in more ways than one. In the 1930’s it was renamed Snowdon Street and when visited in the 1960’s it was found to contain an electricity sub-station instead of houses . Nearby over a doorway was the legend ‘Alabaster Buildings’.

The Hall. parents, George (a lithographic printer) and Caroline were both born in the City of London, married in a Wren Church within sight of St. Paul’s (a casualty of the Second World War) arxl set up house within the square mile. From there they went to what was then called Hoxton New Town but were certainly residing in Market Street by 1851. George Hall died in Market Street in 1896, and as the Census Returns have been released , we have found the continuing tenancy.

The tale goes that Caroline used to say to the landlord ‘ "Mr. Alabaster, I have been living in this house for over forty years , you should give it to me" ! To which Mr. Alabaster would reply, ‘ "Now you know I can’t afford to do that" . ‘ However, from the records the Alabasters owned a number of houses and even had a public house interest.

So, we have nearly proved the time span of ‘over forty years ‘ but so far have been unable to prove the ten children. Nine children can be accounted for, but the last remains elusive

Diana M . Frances Manning

 index


WILLIAM KERMODE of ‘MONA VALE’

This story is taken from the ‘Tasmania Bushrangers’ by K. Von Steiglitz, published in 1951.

"There was no other training for young bush rangers than those provided by their thieving propensities and a natural aptitude for the profession.

These, combined with a disinclination for ordinary hard work and perhaps a slave driving master, turned out many bandits with first class degrees in cruelty and crime.

This is the story of a young man, only recently turned bushranger, eager to learn and a real tryer, who set out to catch Mr. Kermode.

It was known that he would be driving down to Hobart Town from ‘Mona Vale’ at Ross on a certain day, at which time, it was generally supposed, he would have a bag full of gold sovereigns beside him on the seat of the gig.

This was surely an easy enough mark for any enterprising young robber to tackle , for Mr. Kermode was not as young as he used to be and it was known that he would be travelling alone.

The young villian chose a spot in the road where Kermode’s vehicle must pass close to a stump in a thicket of wattles beside the track.

Here he waited, with a filthy handkerchief tied round his face, in the approved method by way of a disguise.

With clammy hands grasping his old musket , the young robber waited for the gig, which was coming nearer and nearer in a little cloud of dust, through the trees. The veins in his neck were pimping violently, and the old musket trembled with his excitement. Stepping out quickly from behind the stump he ordered "Stop, hands up , your money or your life" , and levelled his piece point blank at Mr. Kermode.

Ah, " said the old man, "I think I’ll keep them both" and reaching over, he wrested the gun from the unsuspecting novice and caught him over the head with it. The miserable bushranger instantly crumpled to the ground in a limp heap, with a host of stars swinging before his eyes.

With surprising agility and strength for one of his age , Kermode quickly jumed out and picking him up in his arms , threw him on the floor of the gig.

Then getting in himself, he put his feet on the miscreant and drove off to Oatlands, where he tossed him out at the door on the police station. The startled sergeant of police , who came hurrying out , was ordered to "Lock him up immediately, and not to stand there all day with his mouth open", and Kermode drove on to Hobart Town."

Mrs. M.D. Gorman, Australia.

index


ADDENDUM - QUARRY's of BALLAYODDAN

 

The 3 instalments of the Quarry's of Ballavoddan appeared in Vol. V, No.3, No.4, 1983, and Vol VI, No.1, 1984.

 

Miscellaneous

Three entries on the Mormon roll are incorrect and I an grateful to Miss Ann Harrison of the Manx Museum for checking the original Parish Records for me:

1. William Frederick Quary, christened Andreas 01 August 1841 is actually Drury;

2. Eliza Quarrey, christened Lezaye- 07 January 1844 is actually Quinney;

3. Elinor Quary , christened Onchan in 1735 is actually Quark.

A small number of Mormon roll entries need to be fitted into the above pages (the Parish Records will probably give immediate answerers

Marriage:

16 January 1878 - Walter Quarrie to Martha Bell at St. Thomas's, Douglas.

Birth:

08 October 1876 - John William to John Quarry & Margaret Beck of Ballaghennie, ,-Kirk Bride.

Miscellaneous (other)

Birth:

29 April 1888 Emma to Walter Quarrie, labourer, and Eliz Ann Looney of The Quay, Ramsey.

Death:

17 August 1848 Eleanor Quarry buried at Andreas, aged 3 months (lb ix?)

10 August 1868 Agnes Quarry of Ballabligg. buried at Bride.

24 January 1870 - Walter Quarrie Kneen buried at Andreas. age 2 mnoths (son of 2J?)

14 September 1870 - Henry Quarrie of Aust, buried at Lezayre, aged 4 yrs.

01 January 1918 - Gunner James Martin Quarrie died at 'Bolivia'. Lezayre (also on the Lezayre War Memorial)

26 December 1921 - Margaret Ann Quarrie, wife of John of 31 Bowring Road. Ramsey, died at Church Cottage, Ballaugh, aged 54, leaving a son and daughter in Liverpool.

circa 1909 - William Quarrie of East Kimmeragh, Bride. His wife Ann (nee Caley, of B. Kimmeragh, sister of John Caley) died at Oliver House, Bowring Road, Ramsey, on 22nd May 1924, aged 64 years -buried at Bride.

1881 Bride Census, Shellag:

Thomas Howland, 28, Farm lab., wife Eliza a., 34, Sophia Quarrie, 11. Stepdaughter. All Bride Born.

General:

23 July 1867 - J.M. Quarrie of Andreas sold 4 animals at Sulby Fair to a Ramey butcher.

1868 - Walter Quarrie of "Loch-ny-Yeigh", Lezayre.

1893 - W. Quarrie, Secretary of Christ Church, Maughold.

1893 - H.D. Quarrie (lb xi?) President of the Northern Ploughing Association.

1894 - H.D. Quarrie, Vice-President of the Northern Ploughing Assoc.

19 Mar. 1908 - Henry Deans Quarrie fined one shilling by the High-Bailiff at Ramsey for riding a bicycle without lights down Bride Hill.

1908 - H.D. Qua:rrie, 'tenant of house named ARGOBANK on Ramsay's Grove Mount Estate'.

1922 - "Homecomers" included a Donald Quarrie who had been farming at the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, for a good many years.

1923 - James Quarrie 'Overseer for the IOM Harbour Board, at Ramsey'.

 

Michael Callister, London

 


 FHS index

Back index next

 

Any comments, errors or omissions gratefully received MNB Editor
HTML Transcription © F.Coakley , 1999