hidden-metaphor

Manx Genealogy Archive 2

Re: Transfer of farms by will or sale ?

Nigel many thanks for that. I think we are getting somewhere at last with the elusive Ann.

The "sale" from John Leece of Ballaleece farm to his attorney in 1784 a short time before his will and subsequent death interests me greatly as there is a very quick sale from the attorney to Ann, who was one of the executors of John Leece's estate. Could this be something to do with Manx law.

My guess is that John Leece made a sale to the attorney on trust, to act as his agent, with a condition that it was to be sold back to Ann, the difference in price perhaps reflecting the fees and commissions for the attorney.

John Leece, with the 1100 cash, or maybe just a credit note from the lawyer, gave that to his fiancee, and she then used that money or credit, plus 116 13s 4d from elsewhere to "buy the estate back", so that it was in effect a gift to her by her fiancee, but was technically his sale to the attorney and purchase by her.

I dont understand why this was done, but I have a vague idea that there was some restriction in Manx law on how a quarterland farm could be disposed of by will. My impression is that a quarterland farm could be sold as the owner chose, but that there were restrictions on how it could be willed away.

Would a transfer by will that failed to meet the rules be struck down, and if so would the right to the farm go back to parents and siblings if any, then to grandparents and then descend to the nearest cousins ? In other words, if John Leece had left the farm to his sweetheart, would distant cousins have tried to grab it as next of kin ? My guess is that John Leece thought she was the best thing before or since sliced bread, and wanted to make sure that if he couldn't be around, that it benefitted her.

I MAY BE TALKING COMPLETE RUBBISH HERE, HENCE THESE CAPS, AS I DO NOT WANT ANYONE TAKING THIS AS GOSPEL but is this what it is all about ?

Can anyone confirm this

You asked re a sale of Kella after the Casements settled in Ireland. The Casement family tell me that Ewan/Hugh Casement and his wife sold the Kella to John Corlett of Balnahowne, Lezayre, whose wife was seemingly Catherine Casement of the Grange, Lezayre for 625 on 7 July 1749

Robert